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Forum Search for "cockpit coaming"

12,268 posts on 2,444 threads   •   From Mar 07, 2004 - Jan 08, 2012

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Search for "cockpit" & "coaming"
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Message Author Message Content   (1 of 14)
- Live Message on Active Forum -

Greg Johnson
(Member)

Bud--Include me with the cockpit coamings pic's--thanks

Message Author Message Content   (2 of 14)
- Live Message on Active Forum -

Bud Taplin
(Member)

Terence Singh wrote:Having sailed Liberate some 1400 miles south down the west coast I am more than pleased with her sea worthiness....One area that I must attend to is her ability to keep the crew in the cockpit wet in heavy seas. There is a definite need to try and retrofit cockpit combings that prevent seas washing don the decks and flooding the cockpit. Is there any advice by trial and or error for a suitable design? any suggestions on Fiberglass versus wood? Any opinions on the Hans Christian style Dam versus Combings?


I have a number of pictures of various versions of cockpit coamings I have seen on the boats. Send me an email I can send them to you.

Bud


Message Author Message Content   (3 of 14)
- Live Message on Active Forum -

Stephen Yoder
(Member)

David Wiencke wrote:

Elena's combing

Yep, that's it. Kind of hard to see in this photo. I have a higher res version that I'll e-mail to Jay. Maybe he can put it on the site somewhere.
-Steve
(see above messages - Jay)
Last modified: October 20, 2011 7:15 PM | Jay Bietz (Administrator)

Message Author Message Content   (4 of 14)
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Jack Webb
(Member)

Terence Singh wrote:Having sailed Liberate some 1400 miles south down the west coast I am more than pleased with her sea worthiness....One area that I must attend to is her ability to keep the crew in the cockpit wet in heavy seas. There is a definite need to try and retrofit cockpit combings that prevent seas washing don the decks and flooding the cockpit. Is there any advice by trial and or error for a suitable design? any suggestions on Fiberglass versus wood? Any opinions on the Hans Christian style Dam versus Combings?

Terence,

I hope you get some feedback on this, as I would like to do the same on Drifter. As you probably noticed, however, it's virtually impossible to search the archives any longer on this site. My own search site, however, will give you several good threads related to this topic...



You might try a few different spellings in your searches, as this might give you more results. The correct spelling is "coaming", but I have found results under "combing" and "coming" as well.

Hope this helps... I'd love to see what you end up doing.

Jack Webb
s/v Drifter



Message Author Message Content   (5 of 14)
- Live Message on Active Forum -

Jay Bietz
(Administrator)

Terence Singh wrote:A good ending to my story. SV Liberate has a re-built transmission courtesy of Eskelund Marine. Took 3 weeks to complete, many thanks to Darrel and to all that reached out to help a fellow Westsailor!
4 days post our departure from SF (Nasty through the Gate) Libeate now basks in San Diego awaiting a mood to head further south....
The next project....cockpit coamings....I will start a new thread "in the Yard"


Terence: Glad it all worked out for you and Liberate -

Jay


Message Author Message Content   (6 of 14)
- Live Message on Active Forum -

Terence Singh
(Member)

A good ending to my story. SV Liberate has a re-built transmission courtesy of Eskelund Marine. Took 3 weeks to complete, many thanks to Darrel and to all that reached out to help a fellow Westsailor!
4 days post our departure from SF (Nasty through the Gate) Libeate now basks in San Diego awaiting a mood to head further south....
The next project....cockpit coamings....I will start a new thread "in the Yard"

Message Author Message Content   (7 of 14)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Randell 'Randy' Kocurek

Hi, Bud,
Just thought I remembered you saying that there should have been a block of wood under the lazarette hatch to provide ventilation for that hot, hot engine room. My hatch has not had such a block, as far as I know, and the bottom of the teak frame sits flush on the hatch coaming. I saw George S. yesterday and his W28 has ventilation in its lazarette hatch, though not blocks of wood.
My question is,
"How do I bring the teak hatch ventilation back to original intended specifications?" There is a hole cut in the side of the cockpit that I would like to close. I think a fan used to live there.
I am thinking some 1/4" or even 1/8" spacers under the lazarette hatch would give plenty of ventilation and still do a pretty good job of keeping out water (sort of like a Dorade vent due the higher coaming). Of course, I may be wrong.
Thanks in advance.
Randy

Message Author Message Content   (8 of 14)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Michael Dougan

I've got seatbacks that double as a cockpit coaming and they make things pretty comfortable, if you sit with your back to the coach house.

These folks look pretty comfortable:

matt
amanda

The Westmarine seats would be good for sitting at the helm. I'd make a strap to tie around the boom gallows to keep them in place.

Message Author Message Content   (9 of 14)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Wendy Smith and Paul Bowling

Kia Ora John and Helena,
We have Westsail #425, we previously owned a Cavalier 32(New Zealand designed boat) with the standard cockpit. We did at first find the Westsail cockpit different, quite open. We have found though that you have more scope with it to do what you want.
I have just made some bean bags for our cockpit, they are circular in shape and low, so they are not precarious to sit on. They are great for leaning back on or sit on and also waterproof, so it doesn't matter about a bit of boat wash.I have put some photo's on our blog page http://www.sailblogs.com/member/kabuki/. We also use closed cell foam camping pads.

Our thought's on water in the cockpit is, if it is going to get wet in the cockpit, you will be wearing wet weather gear anyway, so it will not be a problem.
Some Westsails do have coamings built to stop the water getting to the cockpit, we have seen a few examples of this on the internet and here in NZ. We have decided to just go with the flow, and accept that a Westsail can be a little wet on occasion. It does not detract from our sailing experience.


Cheers from down under

Wendy
S/V Kabuki


Message Author Message Content   (10 of 14)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Randell 'Randy' Kocurek

Just got both the fuel tanks off my W32 yesterday, 1974 hull, wooden shelves port and starboard. Took engine out last week. Started with the stbd tank, the "easy" one, I thought. Well, not on my boat with all the wires, hoses and other complications. I could hardly believe Bud's manual's suggestions regarding standing the tank on its head and reversing it to come down top down to where the top of the engine would be. It seemed like there was no way that tank would go tail end up under the cockpit coaming, but it did! I was amazed. Bud's instructions were perfect and after some minor wrestling some wires the tank was literally in my lap. Port side went much smoother and had it out six hours later. Two original steel tanks-- out. Bud's new aluminum tanks will have the advantage, I hope, of being reconfigured for easier installation and future removal. Not a bad plan. There is one tip: as you begin rotating the tanks the aft end will tend to slide down and you can reach back and cut the fuel vent line and remove the vent fitting at the aft top of each tank. Easy to reach and only takes a few minutes with an adjustable wrench.
Another tip, it may take some time to thoroughly drain the tanks but it is time well spent. No spills and the tanks are light. Even the heavier steel tanks were light enough for me to carry off the boat over my head alone (barely).
Randy

Message Author Message Content   (11 of 14)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Shan and Fran Kiger

Great, Brian!! We have a unique stern with our flushdeck, so cannot fit on a boomkin like Bud's without major adapting. We have a coaming all the way around our cockpit, no flat spot at the lazarette locker.

Message Author Message Content   (12 of 14)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Chip Wheeler (Guest)

I finished installing cockpit coamings for our cruise to Molokai this summer. There already were two five-inch lengths of 1/2 inch stainless all-thread poking up through each quarter deck, both sides of the cockpit footwell. These had been used to mount the flimsy, hollow excuses for coamings that came with the boat when I bought it, when we nearly lost winches and coamings over the side at sea trial.

I went out and bought a chunk of teak seven feet long, ten inches wide and two inches thick for $210. (This is Hawaii, where everything but good sailing weather is expensive.)

I cut the lumber in half for two 3 1/2 foot lengths. Teak lumber comes rough, so sanding was done by belt sander, then a random orbital sander. Before sanding, I had to approximate the curvature of the after wall of the coachroof as it slopes down to the quarter deck. Also, a quarter circle on the tops of the after ends to match the slope of the bulwarks toward the stern seemed appropriate. after bullnosing and sanding, I sealed each board with two coats of straight epoxy resin.

Next, I drilled two half-inch holes on the bottom of each for the all-thread to enter the boards from the deck. I drilled one-inch holes from the top to drop in flat washers, lock washers and hex nuts, and to fit a socket. On final fitting, hardwood dowel (Hemlock was readily available.), one-inch in diameter, dropped nicely into each hole, was marked and cut. I cemented these plugs in with epoxy putty and sanded them flush.

Next, I marked the outline of the butt end approach of each coaming to the after end of the cabin top. I drilled four 3/8 inch holes each in the cabin outside in. From the top of the coamings these came at the 1", 3", 5" and 7" marks. I lined the coamings up to the outline and drilled slightly smaller holes in the forward ends of the coamings through the holes from inside the cabin. These accepted the six-inch stainless steel lag screws, four on each side, with fender washers, the heads and washers sealed in 3M 5200 for good measure.

On final approach, I sealed the coamings to the deck with 5200, cleaning up with mineral spirits. I have two coats of straight epoxy and one coat of Cetol Marine for the time being. Before our rainy season hits in November, I intend to add one more coat of Cetol, then follow with four coats of Cetol Marine Gloss, to complete my standard 2-2-4 procedure for teak that is exposed to our tropical sun. The 5200 and the Cetol have also served to mask and seal the imperfections in the intersection of coamings to cabin top.

The coamings are practically bullet proof. They are great for the helmsman to rest his back against while steering, and for the mate to rest his feet on while snoozing on the bridgedeck. When we buried the rail to weather on our cruise, water rushed past them, so buttresses will have to be added to dam up the water. I have also had to add limber holes to drain rain water from the bridge deck while the boat is at rest. The coamings have doubled nicely as mounts for my new Bimini top and for winch handle pockets. They are strong enough to mount winches, as well, but I already have those on the bulwarks.

Chip Wheeler
Evangeline
Westsail 32, Hull No. 32

Message Author Message Content   (13 of 14)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Bud Taplin
(Member)

I do not have any plans as such, but do have a number of pictures of cockpit coamings that have been built on various Westsail 32's.

Message Author Message Content   (14 of 14)
- Live Message on Active Forum -

David Wiencke
(Member)

Elena's coaming

Last modified: October 24, 2011 7:12 PM | David Wiencke

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