Westsail Owners Alliance - Thread: "Anchoring Methods"
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Thread: "Anchoring Methods"

12,268 posts on 2,444 threads   •   From Mar 07, 2004 - Jan 08, 2012

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Anchoring Methods


RJ Burns
(Member)

Hello All,

I have been "mining" the old files to find some guidance on anchoring methods, rigging/tackle or tips for our W32. We are comfortable with our ground tackle set-up. But are looking to deploy it more efficently and safely (for SUMNA and us).

I seem to remember more information in the past. I am not being critical. I do like the new site. Just growing pains.

We have anchored for short periods in easy weather using our rode (or chain) paid-out over the rollers. I have come to understand this is not a good method for long term or lumpy weather. It really makes a difference. Based on one previous post I have made a nice two legged SST plate chain snubber for using chain.

Our boat currently lives on a mooring and I have made a 7/8" bridle that leads through the bow chocks and then to the sampson posts. Additionally, I have conduit over the bobstay to minimise chafe (works great). When the tide/wind shift the rode does ride against the bobstay with no apparent ill affects.

The information I have found is a little hard to follow. Is the block off of the bow-sprit prefered? Or, a bridle? Any pictures or sketches would be a huge help.

RJ & Jen

W32 SUMNA



David Wiencke
(Member)

I have a photo of that set-up on my boat. Not sure how to post it here. Is there a way??

I rigged it up after the first few times anchoring and finding the problem with "sailing" at anchor and especially the bobstay chafe. This cures both problems. The Pardey's described using this set-up on their first boat, even through a hurricane. I made a wooden ropestrop block that has worked well. I figure the rope strop absorbs some shock load and will certainly let go before the bowsprit gets pulled off taking the rig with it. Actually, with this set-up, the boat's whole rig acts to dampen any shockloads.



Lee Perry
(Member)

R J & Jen,

A few notes and what works for me:

BRIDLES- They work well on a mooring ball or in calm conditions at anchor. While anchored in heavy weather not so well. Your boat will swing to port until the port side takes the load and then to starboard until the starboard side takes the load and back and forth and back and forth putting a heavy strain on the anchor and driving you nuts.

BOBSTAYS- I have seen lots of different stuff covering bobstays. This is a BAD idea as it creates an oxygen starved environment and with sea water present will cause corrosion.

CHAIN GRABBERS- Hooks, chain grabbers, plates and such will chip the galvanizing from your chain and can come loose at inopertune times. Throw them away and use a rolling hitch. It will never fail.

SNUBBERS- A smaller diameter snubber is better to allow some stretch.

WHAT I USE- A 1/2" 3 strand nylon with thimble and shackled to the cranse iron at the end of the bowsprit tied to the chain with a rolling hitch. It should be at least 10 feet to 20 feet long. Set your anchor, tie the snubber, let the chain out until the strain is on the snubber. Let out a little more chain to hang in a loop and it won't bang on the bobstay.

Lee



Dick Mills
(Administrator)

David,

I run my snubber from the forward cleat, out the forward hawse pipe and then tie it to the chain rode with a rolling hitch. I keep it short enough that it doesn't rub on the bobstay; 3-4 feet outside the hawse pipe. I use 5/8 nylon with good stretch. We've used that in sustained winds of 50+. it works well.

This setup lets us ride about 15 degrees off the wind. She takes both wind and waves more comfortably at that angle. I can't say for sure if we swing less that way but I do know that it is extremely rare for the boat to swing so much that the rode touches the bobstay.

In extreme conditions the biggest risk is that the snubber (or rope rode) overheats from stretching, approaches melt temperature, then (in its weakened state) chafes at the point where it rubs on the rail or guides. To reduce that risk, first keep the distance from the deck fastening to where it goes over the rail (or bowsprit block) as short as possible. You want all stretching outboard and as little as possible inboard. Second, use chafing gear. I use a length of hose as chafe gear where the rode passes through the hawse pipe.

Sorry, no photo. I'll take one at next opportunity and post it.




Ken Bridger
(Member)

On Satori I my setup was just like Dick Mill's method, except instead of a rolling hitch I used a chain hook. I never noticed any wear of the galvanized coating. The boat lay about 15 degrees off and she was much more settled. I used fire hose for chaff or if overnight in light winds just a rag. Ken


Jay Bietz
(Administrator)

David Wiencke wrote:

I have a photo of that set-up on my boat. Not sure how to post it here. Is there a way??

I rigged it up after the first few times anchoring and finding the problem with "sailing" at anchor and especially the bobstay chafe. This cures both problems. The Pardey's described using this set-up on their first boat, even through a hurricane. I made a wooden ropestrop block that has worked well. I figure the rope strop absorbs some shock load and will certainly let go before the bowsprit gets pulled off taking the rig with it. Actually, with this set-up, the boat's whole rig acts to dampen any shockloads.


David: I just posted a how to at New Web Site - a copy and paste should work.



Jay Bietz
(Administrator)

To the cruisers -- I use 30' of chain and 250' of braid nylon here for my SF Bay cruising and will the rolling hitch work there also - or do I need to and all chain rode?



Lee Perry
(Member)

Jay Bietz wrote:

To the cruisers -- I use 30' of chain and 250' of braid nylon here for my SF Bay cruising and will the rolling hitch work there also - or do I need to and all chain rode?


Jay,

Since you are using nylon line already you don't need a snubber. You can run your line through a snatch block at the end of the bowsprit to keep it away from the bobstay. After anchoring, snap the block onto the rode,attach it to the end of the bowsprit and you are done. A rolling hitch and snubber will work but you have to watch for chaffe between the two lines. At times a stern line taken forward to the anchor rode with a rolling hitch will change the angle of the bow into the swells keeping her from rolling you out of your bunk at night.

Lee

Last modified: 26 Jun 2011 1:44 PM | Lee Perry


Jay Bietz
(Administrator)

Lee Perry wrote:
Jay Bietz wrote:

To the cruisers -- I use 30' of chain and 250' of braid nylon here for my SF Bay cruising and will the rolling hitch work there also - or do I need to and all chain rode?


Jay,

Since you are using nylon line already you don't need a snubber. You can run your line through a snatch block at the end of the bowsprit to keep it away from the bobstay. After anchoring, snap the block onto the rode,attach it to the end of the bowsprit and you are done. A rolling hitch and snubber will work but you have to watch for chaffe between the two lines. At times a stern line taken forward to the anchor rode with a rolling hitch will change the angle of the bow into the swells keeping her from rolling you out of your bunk at night.

Lee

Thanks Lee -- that's kind of what I'm doing on the Angel Island mooring balls fore and aft - not much anchoring yet but hopefully soon.


David Wiencke
(Member)

Jay Bietz wrote:
David Wiencke wrote:

I have a photo of that set-up on my boat. Not sure how to post it here. Is there a way??

I rigged it up after the first few times anchoring and finding the problem with "sailing" at anchor and especially the bobstay chafe. This cures both problems. The Pardey's described using this set-up on their first boat, even through a hurricane. I made a wooden ropestrop block that has worked well. I figure the rope strop absorbs some shock load and will certainly let go before the bowsprit gets pulled off taking the rig with it. Actually, with this set-up, the boat's whole rig acts to dampen any shockloads.


David: I just posted a how to at New Web Site - a copy and paste should work.

Thanks Jay. I tried the copy/paste from my computer before, which didn't work, and now I've uploaded the photos to the picasa site and it looks like it will work.

The set-up on Neverland: 50" of chain, 250" nylon rode, snubber attached with rolling hitch to rode (or chain), runs up through a block at end of bowsprit and back through hawspipe to samson post.

Here's a photo I saved from Dick's site when I was looking at how others had delt with the bobstay-chafe/sailing thing a few years back.

Our first sail with Neverland was down Chesapeake Bay with two days of 30-40kt winds and higher gusts coming right up the bay. Our second anchorage was protected from the wind by only a low thin strip of land and we were buffeted by gusts all night that heeled us way over and sailed us back and forth. Even with a snubber rigged similarly to Dick's picture above the rode was playing the bobstay like bow on a violin string. Not a good night's sleep. That's when I decided to try the block at the end of the bowsprit. Of course, we've rarely experienced such extreme anchoring conditions since, but I'm very happy with the set-up.

Last modified: 28 Jun 2011 2:45 PM | David Wiencke

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